Posts tagged remarketing
Dynamic Remarketing: Building The Best Lists

Dynamic Remarketing gives advertisers the unique ability to remarket with banner ads that showcase the exact products the potential customer viewed. The caveat, as with all remarketing, is of course that the potential customer had to visit your site in the first place. The potential for this new type of remarketing is huge, and we encourage you to test a Dynamic Remarketing campaign against your existing Remarketing campaigns to see what works best for you or your clients.

Dynamic Remarketing Examples

Source: ThinkWithGoogle.com

As we started setting these campaigns up for our clients (and followed Google's setup guide here), we ran into a few snags with the automatically generated lists created by Google. Upon further review, and a phone call or two to our Google reps, we now create our own lists through Google Analytics and do not rely on the accuracy of Google's pre-populated lists for a couple of reasons:

  1. They didn't work.
  2. When they did work, we tested their lists vs. ones that we created, and the list sizes were wildly different (and much smaller when created by Google).

How To Build Your Initial Lists

For each of these remarketing lists you build in Analytics, make sure to check the radio button "Create my own remarketing type using Segments."

1. Pageview>1; Did Not Checkout

Our first list is essentially an "All Site Visitors" list but a little more targeted. First of all, we want to make sure they didn't bounce right away, and second, we want to make sure they didn't check out. To ensure they didn't bounce, we set the Pageview to >1, and to ensure they didn't checkout, set your Transactions to equal 0.

Custom Remarketing List in Google Analytics

 2. Abandoned Cart

Hopefully you already have an Abandoned Cart list you can use from your general Remarketing campaign. If not, setup this list in the same way we started #1. Under the Conditions section, you'll want to add 2 Filters.

  1. Page contains [enter the portion of the URL that is specific to your cart]. Example: Page contains /cart.php
  2. Transactions per user are = to 0.

Essentially, the user added something to their cart but did not check out.

3. Product Page View

This list gets a little complicated. If you're lucky enough to have a site that's URL structure contains /product/ on every product page, you're in for an easy list build! Just set Page contains /product/ and Transactions = 0.

If you are like some of our clients, you'll need to get a little creative. For example, we picked specific silos of the site that were the most profitable and combined them in one list, so if a user hits any of those silos or pages and products but did not check out, they'll be included in this list.

 While these three ideas are not an exhaustive list of all the things you could test and build using Google Analytics and Dynamic Remarketing, this is generally where we like to start. Once you begin getting enough data, you can start optimizing and create new tests.

Have a great list idea that isn't mentioned above? Please share it in the comments.

 

How Do I Measure Remarketing Performance?

How do you know if you’re remarketing well? This is a tricky campaign to measure, especially since it’s more likely to play a big part in assisted conversions compared to any other campaign. For ecommerce clients, the “Time to Purchase” report might help give you some insight into how remarketing compares to the typical conversion cycle for last-click conversions. The “Time to Purchase” report (categorized under the Ecommerce Conversion reports) has two views: “Days to Transactions” and “Visits to Transactions.” These two reports together give you a sense of just how engaged remarketed users are within the conversion cycle.

   Photo: Company A remarketing results showing low engagement.

In the above report to the left, 18.18% of remarketing transactions have occurred 7-13 days after the initial visit. However, we see to the right that most remarketing transactions occurred in less than 4 visits to the site. What we’re seeing here is that, potentially, one to two weeks can go by with few visits back to the site before a remarketed customer will convert. This company may be interested in trying to close that time gap with a more robust remarketing strategy.

Alternately in the example below, most remarketing transactions occurred less than 4 days after the initial remarketed visit, yet a significant portion of visitors come back to the site 7-25 times until they convert. These visitors are highly engaged for fewer days. The company below had remarketing results much like what’s shown above until we put an expansive remarketing strategy into place. Now remarketing brings in a significant portion of last-click conversions and assists in almost every AdWords conversion.

   Photo: Company B remarketing results showing high engagement.

Take a look at your "Time to Purchase" reports. If it looks like you’re not getting much engagement through remarketing, it might be time to rework or start up a new strategy. If you’re not sure where to get started, let us know so that we can help.